Pro Plumbers

Needed to replace a water pressure regulator.  Looking at the retail costs of the regulator, they seem to run from abouit $60 to over $300 for one that includes more that the basic control of water pressure in the house.  Had not used a pro plumber for over 20 years so I was not up on the costs associated with needing their help.  I was contacted by at least 3 plumbers but only one, Right Now Plumbers, gave me an instant quote of $394  for the service without me even asking. Although I thought this price seemed a little high for a job that takes less than an hour to complete, I accepted their service.  Must say that the job was done very professionally and would use them again if needed.  However,
I had called Ben Franklin to fix a pin hole leak in the meter horn. Booking an appointment was very easy and the crew (Sid and Brandon) showed up on time. They quickly found out that a stop valve was not working and had to be replaced as well. Sid clearly explained my options and the charges upfront. He dealt with the city for water shut off, went about the job in a quick and efficient manner. Sid was very professional and explained clearly what he was doing. He patiently answered all my questions. Brandon was very practical and frank. As they were finishing up (I had to leave the house for an hour) they spotted a leak in another valve and fixed that also. I thought it was highly ethical of them to do so. Thank you Sid and Brandon!
Baker Brothers Plumbing offers both residential and commercial plumbing services including tank and tankless water heater replacement and maintenance; drain and sewer repairs or replacement; drain cleaning, clearing and jetting; pipe lining and pipe replacement; repipe; gas line repair; slab leak detection and slab leak repair; bathroom and kitchen faucet installation; garbage disposal repair and installation; and most general plumbing repairs in most or all of the following Dallas, TX ZIP Codes: 75229, 75230, 75225, 75220, 75209, 75219, 75247, 75212, 75235, 75201, 75207, 75248, 75287, 75252, 75244, 75254, 75240, 75251, 75248-1713, 75214, 75228, 75243, 75238, 75218, 75206, 75231, 75204, 75226, 75246, 75227, 75208, 75217, 75232, 75224, 75211, 75241, 75215, 75233, 75253, 75216, 75223, 75237, 75249, 75203, 75210
If it’s a toilet issue you’ve got, you’re sure to find the right toilet parts and replacement pieces – including shutoff valves and supply lines – to get your toilet in tip-top shape. We’ve also got shower parts and shower valves, sink parts and faucet parts, as well as everything for bathtub repair – all to get your bathroom up and running in top-top shape.
Most typical single family home systems won't require supply piping larger than 3⁄4 inch (19 mm) due to expense as well as steel piping's tendency to become obstructed from internal rusting and mineral deposits forming on the inside of the pipe over time once the internal galvanizing zinc coating has degraded. In potable water distribution service, galvanized steel pipe has a service life of about 30 to 50 years, although it is not uncommon for it to be less in geographic areas with corrosive water contaminants.
When something goes wrong with your plumbing system, speed is essential. The faster you address the problem, the better off you and your wallet will be. Water can quickly cause thousands of dollars in damage. Leaks can soak floors, ceilings and foundations, causing rot and mold that may make your home uninhabitable. Get a direct quote from a professional plumber.  Continue Reading
Help! The toilet won’t stop running. It’s a bummer, sure, but it’s something you don’t need to call your plumber about. In fact, DIYers should take note that it’s a quick fix that will cost you just $5. For instance, your handle might just be sticking, which can be solved by spraying some lubricant where the handle meets the porcelain. Ready to DIY? Here’s how to fix a running toilet.
Two-handle faucets are most often found in the bathroom, but you see them in some kitchens. Two-handle faucets use three types of mechanisms. The first two are the same as two of the mechanisms used in a single-handle faucet: cartridge and ceramic disc. The third type is a compression (or reverse-compression) mechanism. Compression faucets are the simplest type, using rubber washers that get compressed against one another to seal the valve. They do tend to wear out faster than other faucet types, but are also least expensive to repair.

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In addition to Trenchless Technology, Our licensed technicians and OSHA certified excavation crews specialize in traditional tunneling and sub-slab plumbing repair / replacement.  Detailed analysis and fixed cost proposals for repair are provided to customer upon completion of a hydrostatic pressure test and diagnostic slab leak testing, using a combination of cutting-edge pipelining techniques with traditional excavation to fix foundation leaks while minimizing digging and added expense.  Traditional tunnels or trenches for water line repair or sewer repair are hand dug by crews with confined space training.
Wooden pipes were used in London and elsewhere during the 16th and 17th centuries. The pipes were hollowed-out logs, which were tapered at the end with a small hole in which the water would pass through.[16] The multiple pipes were then sealed together with hot animal fat. They were often used in Montreal and Boston in the 1800s, and built-up wooden tubes were widely used in the USA during the 20th century. These pipes, used in place of corrugated iron or reinforced concrete pipes, were made of sections cut from short lengths of wood. Locking of adjacent rings with hardwood dowel pins produced a flexible structure. About 100,000 feet of these wooden pipes were installed during WW2 in drainage culverts, storm sewers and conduits, under highways and at army camps, naval stations, airfields and ordnance plants.
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