Pro Plumbers

For details about apprenticeship or other opportunities in this occupation, contact the offices of the state employment service; the state apprenticeship agency; local plumbing, heating, and cooling contractors or firms that employ fitters; or local union–management apprenticeship committees. Apprenticeship information is available from the U.S. Department of Labor's Apprenticeship program online, or by phone at 877-872-5627.

Your plumbing service call will begin with a thorough examination of the trouble; then our technician will spend time explaining the problem and outlining your repair options. Our experts will help you evaluate your choices and make the one that’s right for you. We offer you an in-depth review of products and repair techniques so you can make informed decisions on your plumbing needs.
PBT – flexible (usually gray or black) plastic pipe which is attached to barbed fittings and secured in place with a copper crimp ring. The primary manufacturer of PBT tubing and fittings was driven into bankruptcy by a class-action lawsuit over failures of this system.[citation needed] However, PB and PBT tubing has since returned to the market and codes, typically first for "exposed locations" such as risers.

Needed to replace a water pressure regulator.  Looking at the retail costs of the regulator, they seem to run from abouit $60 to over $300 for one that includes more that the basic control of water pressure in the house.  Had not used a pro plumber for over 20 years so I was not up on the costs associated with needing their help.  I was contacted by at least 3 plumbers but only one, Right Now Plumbers, gave me an instant quote of $394  for the service without me even asking. Although I thought this price seemed a little high for a job that takes less than an hour to complete, I accepted their service.  Must say that the job was done very professionally and would use them again if needed.  However,
Plumbing reached its early apex in ancient Rome, which saw the introduction of expansive systems of aqueducts, tile wastewater removal, and widespread use of lead pipes. With the Fall of Rome both water supply and sanitation stagnated—or regressed—for well over 1,000 years. Improvement was very slow, with little effective progress made until the growth of modern densely populated cities in the 1800s. During this period, public health authorities began pressing for better waste disposal systems to be installed, to prevent or control epidemics of disease. Earlier, the waste disposal system had merely consisted of collecting waste and dumping it on the ground or into a river. Eventually the development of separate, underground water and sewage systems eliminated open sewage ditches and cesspools.
As with other construction workers, employment of plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters is sensitive to fluctuations in the economy. On the one hand, workers may experience periods of unemployment when the overall level of construction falls. On the other hand, shortages of workers may occur in some areas during peak periods of building activity.
If there’s a plumbing problem in your home, Abacus Plumbing will fix it. Abacus plumbers are background-checked, highly trained, and state licensed; therefore, you’ll be getting a quality technician to service your home’s plumbing network. Abacus plumbers have years of experience repairing residential plumbing systems; there isn’t an issue they have not tackled, including:

If you need your leaky faucet repaired, don’t wait! Fill out the “Schedule Appointment” form or pick up the phone and call us today – we’ll have your leaky faucets fixed up in no time.  Our plumbing technicians service Baltimore, Washington D.C., Northern Virginia, Delaware and the Philadelphia Area.  The counties we service include the following: Baltimore County, Delaware County, New Castle County, Chester County, Stafford County, Fredericksburg County, Howard County, Montgomery County, Prince Georges County, Anne Arundel County, Harford County, Carroll County, Cecil County, Fairfax, Fairfax City, Alexandria, Arlington County, Loudon County, Prince William County, Falls Church and Manassas.

Many commercial properties face the same plumbing problems as residential buildings. Usually, the plumbing system is much larger and more complex. The effects of plumbing problems can be much more extensive for commercial buildings, as they can interrupt business and impact profits. So it’s critical that you have a plumbing company you can trust when problems strike to minimize disruption to your operations.
It’s time you receive the exceptional plumbing services you deserve. Bud’s Plumbing & Repair Service is here for you 24/7 with the right solution. Know what to expect with our upfront pricing method, honest recommendations, and transparent way of doing business. Call us today at (812) 618-9638 for your free estimate (available during our regular business hours).

Our sewer repair and replacement experts service Baltimore, Washington D.C., Northern Virginia, Delaware and the Philadelphia Area.  The specific counties we service are:  Baltimore County, Howard County, Montgomery County, Prince Georges County, Anne Arundel County, Harford County, Carroll County, Fairfax, New Castle County, Delaware County, Chester County, Stafford County, Fredericksburg County, Fairfax City, Alexandria, Arlington County, Loudon County, Prince William County, Falls Church, Manassas and Cecil County.
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Hello I had a plumber do an estimate for me to replace our copper pipes with plastic as we have no existing walls up in our basement yet...pretty basic job... so we figured we could upgrade as we do live in Northern Ontario and it does tend to get quite cold here in the winters.  We dont have any existing problems with our plumbing right now just figured it would be good time to do the job and perhaps change the pipes to 3 quarter inch for faster flow.  Well I never thought in all my life I would get an estimate back that would state $350.00 an hour in labor...yes that is correct $350.00 an hour...estimated 10 hours for the job to be completed.  So he quoted me $3500.00 for labor alone.. not supplies?  Well needless to say I will be happy with my half inch copper pipes and will happily wait for my bathtub to fill up at a slower pace.  Just wanted to know what your thoughts are on this $350.00 an hour quote?  Thank you and enjoy your day.
We've talked before about home electrical projects you can handle on your own and now it's time to tackle plumbing. The projects we're covering here mostly deal with repairing things like running toilets and leaky faucets, and replacing fixtures like faucets and shower heads. These are beginner-level projects that are fairly easy to do and can save you a lot of money if you tackle them yourself.
I thought that my sump pump had ended its life and needed to be replaced. The contractor I found through Home Adviser came out the following day and arrived reasonably promptly.  The technician tested the pump and it wasn't responding. He then checked the  breaker panel and all seemed well. However he checked to see if power was reaching the outlet, it wasn't so he tripped some breakers and reset them and the power to my pump came on and the pump works so a replacement wasn't necessary. He charged $75.00 which I think was reasonable for a call-out fee and time spent.
Water systems of ancient times relied on gravity for the supply of water, using pipes or channels usually made of clay, lead, bamboo, wood, or stone. Hollowed wooden logs wrapped in steel banding were used for plumbing pipes, particularly water mains. Logs were used for water distribution in England close to 500 years ago. US cities began using hollowed logs in the late 1700s through the 1800s. Today, most plumbing supply pipe is made out of steel, copper, and plastic; most waste (also known as "soil")[21] out of steel, copper, plastic, and cast iron.[21]
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