Pro Plumbers

PVC/CPVC – rigid plastic pipes similar to PVC drain pipes but with thicker walls to deal with municipal water pressure, introduced around 1970. PVC stands for polyvinyl chloride, and it has become a common replacement for metal piping. PVC should be used only for cold water, or for venting. CPVC can be used for hot and cold potable water supply. Connections are made with primers and solvent cements as required by code.[22]
"We have found our plumber for life! Jim is awesome! We just bought a house with a leak in the foundation, and in spite of the complicated and extensive nature of the repairs needed, Jim quoted us an incredibly reasonable price. Having just closed on a house, though, we were extremely short on funds, and so to help us out, Jim did a temporary fix for much less, and even though he was going above and beyond and doing this extra work for us, he said he'd even deduct the cost of that repair from the total of the final, permanent repair, when we had that done!! I can't say enough good things about him - there's much more, but I don't have room!"
Present-day water-supply systems use a network of high-pressure pumps, and pipes in buildings are now made of copper,[25] brass, plastic (particularly cross-linked polyethylene called PEX, which is estimated to be used in 60% of single-family homes[26]), or other nontoxic material. Due to its toxicity, most cities moved away from lead water-supply piping by the 1920s in the United States,[27] although lead pipes were approved by national plumbing codes into the 1980s,[28] and lead was used in plumbing solder for drinking water until it was banned in 1986.[27] Drain and vent lines are made of plastic, steel, cast-iron, or lead.[29][30]
Hi Ginger, We're sorry you had this experience with a plumber in our network. Have you left the review for the company? We encourage homeowners to share their experiences so others have an honest idea of the company they are hiring. If you would like to speak with a rep regarding your concerns please reach out to [email protected] If you have a review you would like to submit please send it to [email protected] or visit this link: http://www.homeadvisor.com/write-a-review/. -HASupport
Most plumbers wont mess with the septic tank. We deal mostly with components inside the house. Did you have a vent pipe in the yard (often looks like a candy cane made of PVC) before the repair but not after? If all he did was replace the line it shouldn't cause a smell inside the house. All plumbing fixtures inside the house should have properly functioning traps. Those traps would create and maintain a water seal against the sewer gases. You should have at least one vent through the roof to equalize pressures within the drainage system. This prevents positive pressures within the system (caused by fixtures discharging into the lines, ie toilet flush) from pushing gas out through the traps, and negative pressures (the waste in line will pull air behind it like your finger over the end of a straw) from sucking water out of the traps.
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The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[3] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[4] and some were also covered with lead, lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[5] In medieval times anyone who worked with lead was referred to as a plumber as can be seen from an extract of workmen fixing a roof in Westminster Palace and were referred to as plumbers "To Gilbert de Westminster, plumber, working about the roof of the pantry of the little hall, covering it with lead, and about various defects in the roof of the little hall".[6] Thus a person with expertise in working with lead was first known as a Plumbarius which was later shortened to plumber.
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